Ethics in Practice Research (12.6.19)

June 12th, 12.30–4pm, Dance Studio, Stage@Leeds.

Lunch and panel discussion:

‘Ethical relations are lively; they exist beyond any approved plan or institutional protocol for research. Ethics in Practice Research inhabit the realm where we forge our investigatory journey and shape responses to our questions in socially inter-relating contexts of practice.’

Our discussion seeks to illuminate responsibilities inherent in cycles of ethical practice, recognising appreciation for relationality as a feature of the cultivation of ideas.

How do we conceptualise ethics as a feature of knowledge generation from speculative beginnings to responsible outcomes?

What might identify ethics-led practice research?

In what ways can ethics be put to use in participatory research?

Please sign-up here so we know how many to cater for.

Panel Members

  • Dr Helen Graham: Associate Professor in the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies.
  • Professor Victor Merriman:  Victor is Director of Research in the Department of Performing Arts, Edge Hill University, where he leads the Performance and Civic Futures Research Group.
  • Dr Lourdes Orozco: Lourdes is Editor of Performing Ethos: An International Journal of Ethics in Theatre and Performance (Intellect) and lecturers in the School of English, Workshop Theatre, University of Leeds.
  • Professor Sarah Whatley:  Sarah is Director of the Centre for Dance Research at Coventry University.
  • CEPRA
    • Dr Scott McLaughlin: Director of CEPRA based in the School of Music.
    • Dr Fiona Bannon. Director of CEPRA based in the School of Performance and Cultural Industries.

 

Biographies:

Professor Sarah Whatley:  Sarah is Director, Centre for Dance Research at Coventry University. Research is focused on the interface between dance and new technologies, dance analysis, somatic dance practice and pedagogy, and inclusive dance. The AHRC, the Leverhulme Trust, Wellcome Trust and the European Union fund her current research, which is broadly focused on the impact of digital technologies on tangible and intangible cultural heritage.

Professor Victor Merriman:  Victor is Director of Research in the Department of Performing Arts, and leads the Performance and Civic Futures research group at Edge Hill University. Research concerns post-colonialism and late twentieth-century Irish theatre. He is a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of Cambridge Scholars Press; the International Advisory Board of Perspectives in the Arts and Humanities Asia; a board member of the Liverpool Irish Festival, and a member of National Council of the British Association of Irish Studies.

Dr Lourdes Orozco: Lourdes is the Editor of Performing Ethos: An International Journal of Ethics in Theatre and Performance (Intellect). As a Theatre Studies scholar Lourdes has a background in Modern European Languages and Societies, Literary Studies and Cultural Studies. Recent publications focus on contemporary performance practice in Western Europe. Lourdes co-edited special issues of Contemporary Theatre Review on Catalan Theatre and Flemish Theatre  exploring the production of theatre and theatre’s interaction with politics and national identity issues.

Dr Helen Graham: Helen is Associate Professor in the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies.  In her research Helen explores questions of democracy and ‘publicness’ through the technical, practical and ethical sites of co-production of knowledge and exhibits, of intellectual access to museums for people with learning difficulties and of copyright and informed consent.  In her research Helen investigates political dynamics of property, rights and claims; of democracy; of agency and affinity.

Dr Scott McLaughlin: Scott is a Director of CEPRA and lectures in Composition and Music Technology in the School of Music. His practice-led research draws on composition, materiality, and indeterminacy in complex systems. Current research projects use varied methods to excite resonance in sounding bodies.  Areas of interest in teaching and research include, materiality; material-agency; experimental music; chaos theory; ambiguity; interactivity and game-mechanics.

Dr Fiona Bannon  (f.bannon@leeds.ac.uk). Fiona is a Director of CEPRA and lectures in the School of Performance and Cultural Industries.  After a career in Community Arts Practice in the UK and Australia Fiona moved into academia working at the University of Hull and Leeds.  Areas of research include ethics, aesthetic education and collaborative practice. Fiona is Chair of DanceHE and founding member of Architects of the Invisible, a performance collective that explores experimental choreography and social interaction.  Recent publications include, Considering Ethics in Dance, Theatre and Performance (2018, Palgrave).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *